Monday, February 23, 2009

Captivating Capiz-Capiz Shells

CAPTIVATING CAPIZ -Capiz shell is scientifically known as Placuna Placenta, a fan-shaped to nearly round sea shell. This is bivalve, slightly convex upper shell and almost flat lower shell providing a firmly strong protection for its delicious and edible meat.
The wonderful, unique quality of this shell is its translucent, thin and almost colorless nature. Very fine half round lines indicate the growth of this highly valued marine life. Commercially treasured lampshades, light diffusers, door and window shutters together with room dividers are among the handcrafted merchandise. So far no single machine has been invented to completely process a novelty from Capiz seashell. The brilliance and intrinsic beauty of this marine product is beyond human creation.







Captivating Capiz-everything about Capiz

CAPTIVATING CAPIZ.....There are still a lot that you have to know about Capiz. There are still so many treasures yet left unraveled. Capiz is indeed an alluring place. Full of myths and legends, of indigenous culture and people, of wealth and bounty of nature, Capiz has a lot to be proud of. This province is side by side flocked by the blessings of Mother Nature that really makes her thrive and flourish through the years. Be it culture, natural or man-made wonders, and even unexplainable phenomena, Capiz has a lot of spots and destinations to be proud of. These wonders continue to cast a spell to backpackers and tourists who want to enjoy the way the Capiceños live. Take a look at some of the less known, yet awesome and breathtaking wonders that are truly Capiceño. More than just the seafood capital of the country, Capiz also has unique island features and stuff that you can find only in the said province that makes tourists each year come back for more. This is also the best place where you can get your unique experience if you decide to spend a weekend or a vacation trip.

Sunday, February 22, 2009

Captivating Capiz-Capiz, a Province

Captivating Capiz - Seafood Capital Of The Philippines

The Province of Capiz is known as the Seafood Capital of the Philippines.

Discover the Capiz mystic. Explore the rolling hills, mountain peaks and ranges. Enjoy

daytime excursions at the province’s wide beaches and isolated coves. Have a fill of a variety of seafoods available all year round. Visit local gardens, historical sites, old Spanish churches, Southeast Asia’s largest bell at Pan-ay Church, and the birthplace of Manuel A. Roxas (first Philippine President).

Experience local festivals like Balintawakan and Sinadya sa Halaran. Go spelunking. A lot of caves are waiting to be explored. Or you can make special arrangements to witness the Mundo tribe dance in Tapaz.

Accommodations in cottages, hotels, and resorts are available in Roxas City and other municipalities outside the city.

Captivating Capiz History - Capiz Islands Philippines

Capiz, a province where myth and reality merge. One enduring legend about how Capiz got its name goes like this: Balingangan, Datu Bankaya’s eldest son, named his two territories “Kapid” and“Akean” (meaning twin) in honor of his twin daughters “Bulan” and “Adlaw” (moon and sun). Spaniards who later settled in the area adopted the names of Capiz and Aklan.

The arrival of Spaniards in 1569 brought about major changes in the lives of the Capizeños. May 8, 1570, marked the conquest of Panay and consequently the district of Aklan by the Spaniards under the leadership of Martin de Goiti. Capiz was created into a separate ‘encomienda’ and later was organized into a politico-military province in 1716, embracing the neighboring island of Romblon, Tablas, and Sibuyan. The American takeover of the Philippines resulted in the establishment of a civil government in Capiz on April 15, 1901.

The City of Roxas is the provincial capital of Capiz, a part of Panay Island where Miguel Lopez de Legaspi settled when he arrived from Cebu. In 1746, Capiz was made the seat of the politico-military government although it was still ecclesiastically controlled by the Bishopric of Cebu. On May 31, 1847, a Royal Decree turned the province into an alcadia. Roxas City was once known as the Municipality of Capiz and it became a chartered city on May 12, 1951 by virtue of Republic Act No. 603 otherwise known as the City Charter. The late Hon. Lorenzo Arnaldo was its first City Mayor. This city was named “Roxas City” in honor of its most illustrious son, the first president of the Republic of the Philippines, President Manuel Acuña Roxas.

Captivating Capiz Geography - Capiz Islands Philippines

The Province of Capiz occupies a land area of 2,633 square kilometers, representing 21% of the total land area of Panay. It is composed of 16 municipalities and a city with a total of 472 barangays.

Captivating Capiz Political Subdivision - Capiz Islands Philippines

The province is composed of 16 municipalities comprising 473 barangays. It is divided into two political districts: 1st District covers the municipalities of Maayon, Panay, Panitan, Pilar, Pontevedra, Pres. Roxas, and Roxas City; while the 2nd District covers the municipalities of Cuartero, Dao, Dumalag, Dumarao, Ivisan, Jamindan, Sapi-an, Mambusao, Sigma, and Tapaz.

Captivating Capiz Population - Capiz Islands Philippines

As of the year 2000 survey, Capiz has a population of 654,156.

Captivating Capiz Language - Capiz Islands Philippines

Hiligaynon is the dominant dialect spoken in the province.

Captivating Capiz Industries - Capiz Islands Philippines

The even distribution of rainfall throughout the year and the infrequent occurrence of typhoons make the province highly suitable for agriculture, aquaculture, and other related activities – which explains why these are major industries of the province.

Farms for orchids, various ornamental plants, and different varieties of heliconia supply a thriving cut-flower business that is carving a market niche in Southern Philippine provinces. The land has also proven to be good grazing ground for cattle and for raising swine, goats, and poultry. Its long coastal areas abound with “kapis” shells, which are used in the manufacture of exportable novelty items. Numerous home and cottage industries amply augment household incomes, among which are poultry, livestock raising, handicraft, shell-craft, ceramics, lime processing, garments, farm-tool fabrication, furniture and boat making.

Captivating Capiz Special Interest - Capiz Islands Philippines

Spelunking
Go spelunking. The caves of Pilar, Suhot, Igang and Suhoton are waiting for you.

Captivating Capiz Economic - Capiz Islands Philippines

Cutflowers
Aside from its rich fishing grounds, cutflower cultivation is now gaining popularity among the residents in Roxas City as an agri-based income-generating industry.

Cottage Industry
Numerous home and cottage industries amply augment household incomes, among which are poultry and liverstock raising, handicraft, shellcraft, ceramics, lime processing, garments, farm tools fabrication, furniture and boat making.

Captivating Capiz-Capiz Festivals

Capiz Festivals - Capiz Islands Philippines

Sinadya sa Halaran
One of Roxas City’s most important annual events is the Sinadya sa Halaran festival. A fusion of two festivals – “Sinadya” (City) and “Halaran” (Province) which literally means joy in sharing and thanksgiving. It is celebrated on December 4-8 to commemorate the religious activities that embody the true Capiceño spirit. The highlights of the celebration are the Dancing Parade, ”Higantes”, Fluvial Parade, Fireworks display, Mutya sa Halaran beauty pageant, Coronation of the Fiesta Queen, and Agri-Aqua Trade Fair.

Balintawakan Festival
Pontevedra. Balintawakan is a simple gathering, mostly of senior citizens of Pontevedra, Capiz who are sentimentally bound together to an unwritten commitment to preserve a simple tradition which began long ago and was only interrupted by WWII. Every December 31 people hold a Binayle at the town’s public market. Its highlight is the search for Miss Balintawakan as the Festival Queen. The event is capped by a Rigodon de Honor. The Filipino costume called Balintawak is the official attire of the womenfolk participating in the affair.

Captivating Capiz-Sinadya sa Halaran

Roxas City, Capiz -- Sinadya sa Halaran is as much an artistic and cultural celebration as it is a religious celebration. Every year, during the festival, artists emerge from their hiding places to showcase the richness and color of Capiznon tradition, arts and culture.

The parade of festivals is a grand testimony of how rich Capiznon culture is. In this parade, each municipality in the province of Capiz brings their festival to the city in the form of street dancing and pageantry. The richness of culture and tradition in the Province of Capiz and the City of Roxas is very evident in the people's way of life. Aesthetic sense and style are the most common determinants of this affinity to arts and culture.

During the festival arts and culture explode in a rainbow of colors and flavors. The fluvial parade which happens on the Panay River is a reflection of the religiosity of the Capiznons as well as it is evidence of the creativity and the artistry of the people. The solemn procession begins with the public letting afloat hundreds, or even thousands of candles covered with colored cellophane, lighting up the water for the entrance of the Virgin of the Immaculate Conception. The entourage of the main float of the icon is led by numerous colorful lanterns in the shape of huge fishes and other seafood to lay claim to the City's title as the Seafood Capital of the Philippines and to show gratitude for the bounties of the sea. Upon the float's docking at the bank of the river, the night sky explodes with a grand fireworks display. This is only one of the many activities that showcase Capiznon artistry and creativity.

The tribal competition which takes on seafood as its theme is also a colorful display of Capiznon talent. During this contest the streets fill up with energetic dancers in bright and innovative seafood costumes. Some come as mythical sea creatures and dance to the inviting rhythm of drums and bamboo instruments.

While Sinadya sa Halaran is one of those activities that puts Capiznon arts and culture up on a pedestal, you can simply look around you and see tangible evidence of the Capiznon artistic spirit. In the Panublion Museum one can marvel at the art work that the local artists group has created through the years. Paintings speak of pastoral scenes derived from everyday Capiznon life as well as creative and insightful renditions of issues and events. There are also sculptures and commercial art for sale that would definitely look appropriate in any metropolitan home.

The food in Capiz and Roxas City is also living evidence of Capiznon culture and tradition. Presentation may not be a big factor in Capiz culinary exploits but the flavor can make you come back for more. The secret to Capiznon cooking is particular attention given to the freshness of ingredients, as well as the harmonious mix of indigenous herbs and spices. The culinary experience in Capiz and Roxas City can be experienced during the Seafood Festival of Sinadya sa Halaran which runs every night for the entire duration of the festival. Here, local concessionaires sell their culinary masterpieces at the city plaza for all to savor and experience. Of course the best way to enjoy the country's freshest seafood is by simply broiling methods, but come to the festival and you will be astonished at how simple broiling can bring out the best in the best seafood in the country.

All in all, Roxas City and Capiz can truly present you with a very exciting mix of culture, arts, and tradition. In this place myth, legend, tradition, culture, and history blend together to give you a multi-sensory experience of what the Seafood Capital of the Philippines and the Garden Center of Panay is truly like. Sinadya sa Halaran is the best time to experience this grand unison. The festive mood will definitely plunge you into a diverse pallet of culture, history, art, and tradition. Welcome to Sinadya sa Halaran 2005!

Captivating Capiz-Capiz Beaches Photos




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Captivating Capiz-Places to Visit

Captivating Capiz is one of province of the Philippines that is considered to be the seafood capital of the country because of its abundance of the natural resources get from its surrounding sea. Crab, diwal (angel wings, a popular seashell that is abundant in the place), oysters and shrimps can be bought in cheap from different small stalls gathered in the surrounding beaches of the province. The place is also known to have a lot of dried fish sold in their local markets. Aside from being known to be the largest source of tasty seafoods in the country, Capiz is also known to have several amazing places where tourists are really attracted. Some of them are the following:

a. Olotayan Island - It is an island that can be overseen whenever you are in the Roxas City beaches. Its white sand makes it to be a potential future Boracay Island of the province. The place is not yet developed but it already attracted a lot of divers and jet ski hobbyists. The combination of the black sand and white sand in its beaches making it unique and very eye catching. If you're a nature lover and love a peaceful place to have your vacation, Olotayan Island is for you. The place is not yet populated and does not have any night life yet which is very suited to people who wants to sleep in a very peaceful night.

b. The Ancestral House of Pres. Manuel A. Roxas - This is the birthplace of first president of the Republic of the Philippines, Pres. Manuel A. Roxas. The original house still stands at its original site at corner Rizal-Zamora Streets, a few minutes walk from the City hall and the City plaza.

c. Ang Panubli-on, the Roxas City Museum - This is one of the remains of the WWII in Capiz which is only converted into a museum to showcase the art and culture of the native of Capiz, now and then.

d. Balay Capiznon (Previously was the Roxas City Product Display Center) - The venue is the place where the local products of Capiz are displayed. It is located at the foot of the Capiz Bridge and is in the vicinity of the Rizal Monument and the Capiz Provincial Capitol.

e. People's Park - This is the newly constructed (2008) structure of the City government in Baybay, Roxas City. What so nice about this place is this where you can find a lot of appealing stalls selling delightful seafoods where you can choose what to eat and where you can dine while watching the sunset.

There are some of the historical places that the province have. It is a testament of the richness of the history and culture of the province. Now, do you know how to get there? It will only took at about 45 minutes by plane and around 16 hours by boat from Manila, Philippines. But if you are from Iloilo City, travel time to Roxas City, Capiz will be approximately 2 hours by bus or by a private car.

Saturday, February 21, 2009

Captivating Capiz-Tourist Attractions

CAPIZ - Seafoods capital of the Philippines


Pan-ay Church Bell
Cutflower Growing
Cutflower Growing

Abundant Seafoods
Discover the Capiz mystic. Explore the rolling hills, mountain peaks and ranges. Enjoy daytime excursions at the province's wide beaches and isolated coves. Have a fill of variety of seafoods available all tear round. Visit local gardens, historical sites, old Spanish churches, Southeast Asia's largest bell at Pan-ay Church and the birthplace os Manuel Roxas (first Philippine President),

Experience local festivals like Balintawakan (May), Halaran (October) and Sinadya (December).

Go spelunking. These caves are waiting for you: Pilar, Suhot, Igang and Suhoton.

Make special arrangement to witness the Mundo tribe dance in Tapaz.

Accommodations in cottages, hotels and resorts are available in Roxas City and Sigma.

How to get there


Travel time to Roxas City is 45 minutes by plane and around 16 hours from Manila. From Iloilo City, it is approximately 2 hours by bus or private car.

For more Information on Capiz, write or call:
Department of Tourism Region VI
Bonifacio Drive, Iloilo City

Capiz Provincial Tourism Office
City Hall, Roxas City

Tourist Information Center (Iloilo)
Tel.: (033)337-5411
Fax: (033)335-0245

DOT Information Center (Manila)
Tel.: (632)524-1703

Internet
http://www.westernvisayastourism.com.ph
email:deptour6@mozcom.com

Map of Capiz - Click to Enlarge
Click the Image to Enlarge






Villa Borda Swimming Pool

Pan-ay Old Church

Abundant Seafood Harvest

Huge Bell of Panay

Capiz is one the five provinces of Panay Island, Western Visayas. Located 375 miles southwest of Manila, 136 kilometers northwest of Iloilo City and 86 kilometers east of Kalibo, Aklan, once a part of the early Malay settlement known as Aklan. It is composed of 16 municipalities, 1 chartered city (Roxas City) and 472 barangays. Its capital, Roxas City is the seat of the provincial and city governments and center of trade.

Capiz' topography varies from rolling lands and hills to mountain peaks and ranges. The province has the 3rd type of climate, seasonal changes are not pronounced. It is relatively dry from November to April and wet from May to October.

The economy is basically agricultural with palay, corn, coconut, vegetables and sugarcane as principal crops. The rest of the cultivated areas are devoted to fishponds, livestock and other minor crops. It has mineral and non-metallic deposits like zinc, aluminum, gold, iron, purite and copper.

Culasi, Roxas City is served by 2 shipping lines. Philippine Airlines also services the province through the Roxas City airport.

TOURIST ATTRACTIONS

Capiz is noted for its caves, ancient churches, historical sites and cultural events such as the Mundo dance and Halaran festival. The coastal areas are characterized by wide beaches, isolated coves and white sand.

HISTORICAL:

1. Birthplace of Manuel Roxas, Roxas- Located in the city proper, 2 storey hardwood and stone house of First Philippine President Manuel Roxas, now a historical shrine.

2. Moro Towers, Sitio Nipa, Roxas City- Half-torn stone structures built in 1814 to repel the invading Moros and Portuguese colonizers.

CULTURAL:

1. Ang Panublion (Roxas City Museum), Roxas City; built in 1910 as a water tank; has memorabilia of illustrious sons and daughters of Roxas City; collections of religious icons, artifacts and artworks.

2. Mundo Dance, Tapaz dance of the mountain tribe known as Mundo, vanishing remnants of pre-Malayan Indonesian immigrants to Panay.

NATURAL:

1. Baybay Beach, Roxas City; 3 kilometers from city proper; clean black sand; beach houses.

2. Olutayan Island, a 30-minute pumpboat ride from Banica Terminal, Roxas City; crystal clear waters and multi-colored fishes; beach is carpeted with tiny crushed shells called cascaho.

3. Quipot Cave, Brgy. Burias, Mambusao; a thirty minute ride over rough road, from Mambusao Agricultural and Technical College or around 9 kms. from the town proper; has many chambers some of which are as big as hotel ballroom with plenty of stalactites and stalagmites.

4. Napti Island, Pan-ay; about 3 to 4 hectares big located near Olutayan Island; has white sand, small cave and an abundant shells for necklaces.

5. Buntod Beach, Pan-ay; about a kilometer long; located far from the inhabited section of Pan-ay; one of the cleanest beaches in Capiz; has fine black sand with a beach free of jellyfish all year round; approximately ten minutes by jeepneys, cars and tricycles from the town; accessible by speedboats or pumpboats from any point in Capiz.

6. Pilar Cave, Pilar; one and a half kms. from the poblacion of jeepneys, tricycles and cars over rough roads; one and a half kms. with chambers of varying sizes; different plants and orchids hang from the cliffs.

7. Tucad Reef, Pilar; 10 kms. from Pilar shoreline; submarine islet of seashells and corals topped with thin layers of sand .

8. Suhot Cave, Dumalag; situated in Dumalag, Capiz; 300 meters away from the provincial road; has a series of interconnected caverns of different sizes.

9. Igang Maayon; Tapulang, Maayon; a limestone cave; around 7 kms. away from the poblacion; 15 minutes ride by car or jeepney.

10. The Coves Of Ivisan (Bgy. Basiao & Bgy. Baliring); White sand beach coves located 10 kms or 30 minutes by jeepney, car or tricycle over rough roads from the town proper.

11. Suhoton Caves, Jamindan; has multi-layered chambers in its vast interior.

Captivating Capiz-Aswang Festival

Aswang Festival

On October 29 to 30, 2004, Capiz inaugurated the Aswang Festival, organized by a nongovernmental group Dugo Capiznon, Incorporated. It was a Halloween-like Fiesta as a prelude to All Souls Day and All Saints Day festivals. It was, however, condemned by the Catholic hierarchy and some local officials, as an act of adoring the devil. When former Capiz Gov. Vicente Bermejo assumed as mayor of Roxas City in July 2007, the controversial festival was stopped.

Canada's High Banks Entertainment Ltd.’s filmmaker Jordan Clark, 36, traveled to Capiz to film a documentary entitled ‘Aswang: A Journey Into Myth.’ (shot entirely in Victoria, British Columbia’s downtown). The Docu-Movie/suspense film stars Filipina-Canadian stage actress Janice Santos Valdez, with a special appearance of Maricel Soriano. The documentary's proceeds will help raise funds to help restore power in Olotayan Island, Roxas City and support patients of dystonia parkinsonism in Capiz. Capiz has the highest prevalence at 21.94/100,000 cases, which translates to one for every 4,000 men. Aklan has the next highest rate at 7.72/100,000. The figures suggest that XDP is endemic in Panay, particularly in Capiz.


FOR the third time, the controversial but culturally important Aswang Festival was held in Roxas City, Capiz, toward the end of October, in keeping with the spirit of All Souls’ Day, celebrated in the west as Halloween.

As in previous years, the annual festival was greeted with disfavor by local church leaders. In a Pastoral Letter, the local parish proposed a boycott of the festival. On the second day of the event, church followers held a vigil and prayed for rain to stop the activities.
It drizzled a bit, but it did not dampen the enthusiasm of the people who flocked to the center of the town to see the colorful parade and watch the body-painting contest. The Viva Hot Babes, who flew all the way from Manila, performed provocative dance numbers in skimpy attires, thrilling the audience.

According to the organizer of the festival, the Dugo Capiznon Inc. led by Cheryl Ann R. Lastimoso, the church was against the event because it purportedly “promotes belief in aswang and scares the children.”
This is not true. I do not know where members of the clergy in Capiz got that idea because when I asked Lastimoso what the objectives of the Festival were, she said matter-of-factly: “We have three main objectives: first, to reverse the negative image of Capiz as a haven of aswang and remove the stigma attached to the word. We consider aswang simply a myth, with no factual basis. It does not exist except in the imagination of people.

“Second, to promote economic growth by helping small businessmen. We do this through trade exhibits during the festival.

“Third, to promote Capiz as a good tourist destination by highlighting its famous sea food products, fine beaches and other local scenery.”

The festival included an educational component via a symposium where the aswang idea was discussed from the historical, cultural and paranormal aspects. Three resource speakers were invited to shed light on the topic: Cecile Guidote-Alvarez, executive director of the National Commission on Culture and the Arts; Dr. Alicia P. Magos, faculty member of the University of the Philippines Visayas; and this columnist.

Guidote-Alvarez appreciated the cultural significance of the festival as an indigenous alternative to the western celebration of Halloween. She saw it as a good opportunity to remove the stigma attached to Capiz by confronting the issue of aswang rather than being embarrassed by it.

She cited Romania, which suffered for a time by being identified as the birthplace of Dracula.

The Romanians decided to make it a tourist attraction, staging festivities centering on the vampire story. This is what the Dugo Capiznon would like to happen to the aswang myth.

Dr. Magos spoke of the historical origins of the word. During the Spanish era, she said, those who rebelled against the Spaniards were labeled aswang (based on the legend of “Agurang and Aswang” representing good and evil), so people would get scared of them and not follow them.

During that time, aswang referred to the brave Filipinos who fought the Spaniards. They were actually the good guys. In time, the word acquired a negative meaning. Despite the fact that there is no hard evidence to support belief in a monstrous creature called aswang, the idea persisted.

For my part, I talked about the penchant of Filipinos in particular, and Asians in general, for believing in supernatural creatures. Although I said I had not found any evidence of the existence of aswang, there were other supernatural creatures whose existence could be proven, like dwarves and other nature spirits.

Guidote-Alvarez tried to bridge the communication gap between local church officials and the organizers of the festival by talking to the Monsignor about the real intent of the group in staging the event, which was the opposite of what the church feared.

According to her, the Monsignor listened sympathetically to her explanation and somehow understood that there was no intent to promote belief in the aswang.

If the clergy in Capiz had only taken the trouble to read carefully the noble objectives of the organizers of the Aswang Festival, instead of jumping to conclusions, they would not have taken such a negative stance. The church has nothing to fear about the aswang because it does not exist.

Speaking about the attitude of the clergy in Capiz, Jojo Robles, editor in chief of Manila Standard, remarked to me during a dinner hosted by Gen. Lastimoso and family for their guests in a beach resort in Roxas City: “Some people simply have no sense of humor.” He’s absolutely right!

 Aswang Festival 2005
Aswang Festival 2005

Aswang Festival is a culturally significant and controversial celebration in Roxas City, Capiz intended to change the negative connotation attached to the province popularly called domain of aswang by turning the monster into Capiz' premier attraction. This annual festivity runs towards the end of October, in time for the yearly observation of All Saints Day or undas in the Philippines. It has been commonly known as the local version of American Halloween celebrations.

During this time, people of all ages await the parade of participating individuals wearing costumes of the most horrifying mythical creatures like tikbalang, wak-wak, and kapre. Going simultaneously with this event is a trade fair of the famous Capiznon sea food products and other local delicacies.

In 2004, the first-ever Aswang Festival received tremendous negative feedback from the local church, which strongly disapproves of belief in such mythical creatures. But the organizers defended the concept of the festivity. According to them, the festival is aimed at changing the negative impression of Capiz as a home of aswang by recognizing it only as a myth and hopefully removing the stigma attached to the word. It intends to showcase Capiz as one of the country's top tourist destinations having its fine beaches and scenic landscapes. Also, through the trade exhibits, entrepreneurs of small businesses can promote local products to help uplift the economy of the province.


Captivating Capiz-Eduactional Institutes

University/College

Capiz Institute Of Technology
Colegio dela Purisima Concepcion
Filamer Christian College
Pace Computer College
Panay State Polytechnic College-Roxas City Unit
Sigma College of Science and Technology
St. Anthony College of Roxas City
High School

Capiz High School of Arts and Trades
Capiz Institute of Technology High School
Capiz National High School
Colegio de la Purisima Concepcion (High School)
Cong. Ramon A. Arnaldo High School
Don Felix Balgos National High School
Filamer Christian College (High School)
Roxas City School for Philippine Craftsmen
St. Mary's Academy of Capiz
St. Pius X Seminary
Tanque National High School
Primary School

Elementary/Middle School

Antonio Villasis Memorial School
Capiz Commercial School
Company

Antry Construction
Generic

Filamer Christian College - Student Republic
St. Pius X Seminary Alumni Association
Tau Gamma Phi

Captivating Capiz-Roxas City as Seafood Capital of the Philippines

Captivating Capiz

Sapi-an Website Roxas City Panoramic View Municipality of Panay Webiste


























LOCATION Northeastern part of Panay Island
BOUNDARIES North: Sibuyan Sea, Northwest: Aklan, West: Antique, Southeast: Iloilo
LAND AREA 2,633.17 square kilometer
POPULATION 624,469
DIALECT Hiligaynon
COMPOSED OF 473 barangays, 16 municipalities, 1 city (Roxas City)

Captivating Capiz is one the five provinces of Panay Island, Western Visayas. Located 375 miles southwest of Manila, 136 kilometers northwest of Iloilo City and 86 kilometers east of Kalibo, Aklan, once a part of the early Malay settlement known as Aklan. It is composed of 16 municipalities, 1 chartered city (Roxas City) and 472 barangays. Its capital, Roxas City is the seat of the provincial and city governments and center of trade. Capiz' topography varies from rolling lands and hills to mountain peaks and ranges. The province has the 3rd type of climate, seasonal changes are not pronounced. It is relatively dry from November to April and wet from May to October. The economy is basically agricultural with palay, corn, coconut, vegetables and sugarcane as principal crops. The rest of the cultivated areas are devoted to fishponds, livestock and other minor crops. It has mineral and non-metallic deposits like zinc, aluminum, gold, iron, purite and copper. Culasi, Roxas City is served by 2 shipping lines. Philippine Airlines and Cebu Pacific also service the province through the Roxas City airport.

Travel time to >Roxas City is 45 minutes by plane and around 16 hours by ship from Manila. From Iloilo City, it is approximately 2 hours by bus or private car. It will take approximately 4 hours travel going to Boracay Island by land.

Captivating Roxas City, Capiz Philippines

Life in Roxas City, Capiz, Philippines is simple and peaceful. It is an ideal refuge for those who wishes to escape the fast-paced life in modern cities. It owes much of its charms to a mixture of its rich history and natural beauty untrammeled by modernity and this is the reason Captivating Capiz is truly amazing.

Bay-bay Beach

Bay-bay Beach - wide powdery gray-sand and ultimate place to go barefoot, which is therapeutic and truly captivating



Captivating Capiz- Motto of Tapaz, Capiz

Motto

The Municipal Motto of Tapaz shall be “Regnat Populus Dei” or “The People of God Reigns”. It means that the general welfare of the people (of Tapaz), under the guidance of the Almighty God, reigns supreme and is the guiding principle in public service and in local governance and public service.

Captivating Capiz- official flag of Tapaz, Capiz


DESCRIPTION AND MEANING OF THE NEW FLAG (Designed by Peter Marlon H. Exmundo with inputs from Mayor Romualdo G. Exmundo, Jr., MD, and Mr. Leorico Fundal of SNNHS)

1. Head of a Deer — The head of the Philippine Spotted Deer, a deer that is endemic in Western Visayas, particularly in the central region of Panay Island (but gradually becoming extinct and given by the DENR a conservation status of IUCN (EN)), with the scientific name of Cervus alfredi, has always been the unique symbol of Tapaz. Symbolizing the once rich fauna and wildlife of Tapaz, it also symbolizes the indigenous people and cultural heritage of Tapaz. The head has eight horns, four on each antler. Two of the horns, one on each antler, are small buds. In Chinese Astrology, the deer, being a swift and agile animal, symbolizes better economic growth and opportunities. The number eight symbolizes continuity and prosperity in the Chinese beliefs. The two small developing horns also symbolize growth. The seasonal shedding and regrowing of the antlers symbolize eternity and constant renewal of the municipality towards progress and development. The deer is facing east where the sun rises 2. Stars — The two groups of twenty-nine six-point gold stars parallel to the top and bottom borders symbolizes excellence and the component barangays of the municipality. The circle of Fifty-eight six-point gold stars along the inner border of the seal symbolizes the component barangays of the municipality. The six-point star is also known as the Star of David and by its Jewish Name, Mogen David (Shield of David). Its use in the flag of the municipality is our affirmation of our Christian faith and heritage, considering that Jesus Christ belongs to the house of King David of Israel. The Star of David is also the symbol Judaism, the elder religious brother of Christianity. 3. Golden Laurel Leaves — Beneath the fifty-eight gold stars are two golden laurel branches and a golden camia flower (family = Zingiberaceae, Scientific Name = Hedychium Philippinese) at the center. The design is similar to the laurel branches and camia flower in the seals of the Mayor and Vice Mayor. They represent the local government of Tapaz as well as the national and provincial government agencies operating in the municipality. 4. Caption — A banner with a yellow background and orange border with the Phrase TAPAZ, CAPIZ using the Bangle font is written on it is placed over the head of deer to let everyone knows that this flag belongs to Tapaz. 5. The Green Background — The background symbolizes the farming community, which is the primary source of livelihood in the municipality.

SIZE RATIO: (A) The length of the width should be twice the length of the height for a width-height ratio of 2:1. (B) For a 2 x 1 meter flag, the height and width of the star is 6 cm x 5.3 cm. The distance from the top and bottom edges of the border is 12 cm.; (C) The height of the head of the deer from the tip of the antler to the base of the neck is 33.55 cm and the width from the tip of the nose to the deep of the left ear is 21.45 cm. (D) The height of the antler from the tip to the base on top of the head is 13.71 cm. (E) The length of the snout from the tip of the nose to the corner of the snout and the neck is 8.71 cm. (F) For the golden branches of laurel leaves, the length is 31.13 cm and the width is 6.75 cm. (G) For the banner above the deer, the width is 5.16 cm, the length excluding the side pennants on which is the captions are placed is 31.97 cm, and the total length is 39.03 cm.


OVERALL MEANING OF THE NEW FLAG

THE FLAG OF THE MUNICIPALITY was redesigned to give it more meaning and reflect the identity of the Tapaznons. With the new flag we discarded the traditional and common method of simply placing the seal of an agency or of a local government unit in the middle of a rectangular cloth, place two holes along the left border, and tussles along the perimeter to make an instant flag. Instead, we only use the relevant symbols and strategically arrange them along the banner

Despite of the suggestion of some persons to discard the head of the Philippine Spotted Deer in the design of the new seal and flag as an obsolete emblem and relic of a bygone era and that a new one reflective of contemporary and future generations should be adopted, we have decided to retain it for the relevance of its meaning to our identity as Tapaznons. Its retention is a sign of our respect, linkage with, and honoring our past, our traditions, and our cultural heritage — it should remind us of the words of our National Hero, Jose Rizal, when he said “Ang Taong Hindi Marunong Lumingon sa Kanyang Pinanggalingan ay Hindi Makakarating sa Kanyang Paroroonan” — and as a reminder to us of our once pristine and lush flora and fauna. However, we accommodated the suggestions of some notable persons to redesign it to make look more like the deer in our hinterlands. Together with the meaning of the symbolism of the deer, by redesigning it and adding other emblems to it to enrich its meaning, we are also signifying our desire for change and to move forward towards progress and development.

The government/public service/sector, the community/barangays and our Christian faith and heritage, and our principal means of livelihood/the private sector, symbolized by the laurel leaves and camia flower, the stars, and the background, respectively refers to us collectively as Tapaznons.

The banner with the caption “Tapaz, Capiz” crowns the flag, because it symbolizes our pride to be part of the Municipality of Tapaz, in the Province of Capiz and to be called Tapaznons and Capiznons.

Captivating Capiz- Official seal of Tapaz, Capiz


OFFICIAL DESCRIPTION AND MEANING OF THE SEAL UNDER MO 16-01 (Designed by Peter Marlon H. Exmundo based on the general specifications of Mayor Romualdo G. Exmundo, Jr., MD, with inputs from Nona G. Vista, Engr. Victorio Jimenez and Ma. Theresa G. Nepomuceno)

1. Mountain Ranges — The two twin-peak mountain ranges symbolizes the hinterlands and tropical forests of Tapaz and the location of Tapaz at the heart or center of Panay Island. 2. River — the River at the center of the two mountain ranges symbolizes the three largest river systems in the Island of Panay that begins in Mt. Nacuron, in Brgy. Hilwan, a hinterland barangay of Tapaz. Panay River, a 152-kilometer long river feeds the 230,587-hectare Panay River System in the Province of Capiz, or almost 88% of the total land area of the province. Aklan River flows to the Province of Aklan and feeds the Aklan River System in the Province. Both rivers share the same stream in Mt. Nacuron. One of the major streams feeding the main stream feeding Jalaur River, which is located in Calinog, Iloilo, is located in Mt. Nacuron. Jalaur River, feeds the Jalaur River System in the Province of Iloilo. 3. Head of a Deer — The head of the Philippine Spotted Deer, a deer that is endemic in Western Visayas, particularly in the central region of Panay Island (but gradually becoming extinct and given by the DENR a conservation status of IUCN (EN)), with the scientific name of Cervus alfredi, has always been the unique symbol of Tapaz. Symbolizing the once rich fauna and wildlife of Tapaz, it also symbolizes the indigenous people and cultural heritage of Tapaz. The head has eight horns, four on each antler. Two of the horns, one on each antler, are small buds. In Chinese Astrology, the deer, being a swift and agile animal, symbolizes better economic growth and opportunities. The number eight symbolizes continuity and prosperity in the Chinese beliefs. The two small developing horns also symbolize growth. The seasonal shedding and regrowing of the antlers symbolize eternity and constant renewal of the municipality towards progress and development. The deer is facing east where the sun rises. 4. Branch of Leaves — The branch of leaves at the left mountain range symbolizes farming, the chief industry and source of income of Tapaz. As a branch of laurel leaves, it also symbolizes the dignified role of the farmers in our country and the excellent contributions of the Tapaznons in national and international development. 5. The Morning Sun — The morning sun, which is placed at the center of the two mountain ranges, as it rises over the east to begin a new day with its seven rays symbolizing hope and faith for a better future. It also symbolizes our unity with our Filipino brothers and sisters, because the morning sun, which is notable in most Asian flags and seals, symbolizes the sun rising from the East. The number seven is also a mystical and lucky number in most cultures and beliefs. For the Jews, the number seven is the symbol of perfection, thus we have the seven cardinal virtues, the seven beatitudes and the seven habits of highly successful people. Its seven rays symbolize the seven cardinal virtues, and the seven beatitudes 6. The Bird — the bird, specifically the dove, traditionally symbolizes The Holy Spirit. Love and bravery are traditionally symbolized by the color red. The red silhouette of the bird flying in the center of the morning sun symbolizes the spirit of bravery, peace and love living in every soul of each Tapaznon, nourished by the Holy Spirit. However, in the seal the bird is not just a dove but also a parrot or tikoy the official bird of the municipality (which is found in the hinterland of Tapaz and whose number is fast depleting). Its common name in English is “Blue Nape Parrot” and its scientific name is “Tanygnathus luzonensis”. It is placed in the center of the sun and the mountain peaks as a symbol of our unity as Tapaznons under the inspiration and guidance of the Holy Spirit. The bird is facing east where the sun rises. 7. The Blue Background — The background, which is sky blue, symbolizes the clear sky over Tapaz. The color sky blue is usually attributed to the Blessed Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus, and as the color of the Immaculate Conception, the Patroness of the Province of Capiz. 8. Stars — The circle of Fifty-eight six-point gold stars along the inner border of the seal symbolizes the component barangays of the municipality. The six-point star is also known as the Star of David and by its Jewish Name, Mogen David (Shield of David). Its use in the seal of the municipality is our affirmation of our Christian faith and heritage, considering that Jesus Christ belongs to the house of King David of Israel. The Star of David is also the symbol Judaism, the elder religious brother of Christianity. 9. Captions — The seal is surrounded by the following captions: “SAGISAG NG MUNISIPYO NG TAPAZ” (color blue using Bangle as font) and “LALAWIGAN NG CAPIZ” (color red, using Bangle as font). The use of Tagalog or Filipino in the captions symbolizes the unity of the Tapaznons with the Filipino people. The blue and red colors of the captions are the two main colors of the Philippine flag and seal. 10. Numbers — Dividing the two captions are the numbers “1874” and “2005” in gold or yellow orange color. 1874 was the year Tapaz was separated from Dumalag with the appointment of Don Pedro Gimeno as our first local chief executive, which is called at that time as Capitan Mayor, and Padre Jose Aparicio as our first parish priest; and 2005 was the year the new seal was adopted.


OVERALL MEANING OF THE NEW SEAL

THE SEAL OF THE MUNICIPALITY was redesigned to give it more meaning and reflect the identity of the Tapaznons. With the new Seal we added new symbols and arrange them accordingly along the seal as described above to reflect the true identity of the Tapaznons. Despite of the suggestion of some persons to discard the head of the Philippine Spotted Deer in the design of the new seal and flag as an obsolete emblem and relic of a bygone era and that a new one reflective of contemporary and future generations should be adopted, we have decided to retain it for the relevance of its meaning to our identity as Tapaznons. Its retention, together with the number “1874”, the year Tapaz was separated from Dumalag, are signs of our respect, linkage with, and honoring our past, our traditions, and our cultural heritage — it should remind us of the words of our National Hero, Jose Rizal, when he said “Ang Taong Hindi Marunong Lumingon sa Kanyang Pinanggalingan ay Hindi Makakarating sa Kanyang Paroroonan” — and as a reminder to us of our once pristine and lush flora and fauna. However, we accommodated the suggestions of some notable persons to redesign it to make it look more like the deer in our hinterlands. Together with the meaning of the symbolism of the deer, by redesigning it and the number “2005”, the year the new seal was adopted, we are also signifying our desire for change and to move forward towards progress and development. The community/barangays and our Christian faith and heritage, our location in the middle of the Island of Panay, the clear blue skies above us, our principal means of livelihood/the private sector, and our values symbolized by the stars, the twin mountain ranges and the river, the blue background, the branch of laurel leaves, and rays of the sun and the red silhouette of the bird respectively refers to us collectively as Tapaznons. The captions and their blue and red colors is our affirmation of our love for our municipality, province and country and our pride to be part of the Municipality of Tapaz, in the Province of Capiz, of the Republic of the Philippines, and to be called Tapaznons, Capiznons, and Filipinos.


ADDITIONAL AND UNOFFICIAL (NOT PART OF MO 16-01) MEANING OF THE SEAL

MYSTICAL MEANING OF THE NEW SEAL

IF YOU WILL EXAMINE CLOSELY THE SEAL you will find new symbols and meaning to the seal. These symbols were just discovered later, some of then after the Seal was already presented to the public and was in general use by the municipal government and some agencies within the municipality and some a few weeks after the enactment of the Proactive Administrative of Code under Municipal Ordinance No. 16-01 on 14 September 2005. The six-point star or hexagram was placed there for its originality to give Tapaz a star different from the rest. It should be noted that most are using the five-point star or the pentagram in their symbols. About two weeks before the enactment of MO 16-01, the author realized that the hexagram is the Star or Shield of David. Sometime in November 2005, it came to the knowledge of the author that the hexagram is the Jewish equivalent of the Chinese (originally Taoist) “Yin and Yang”, the symbol of universal and cosmic harmony and balance. By surrounding the seal, they provide harmony and balance in municipality. The hexagram is the unity of the pyramid, symbolizing the male or the positive force or energy of nature and the vessel (the reverse pyramid), symbolizing female or negative the negative force or energy of nature. The positive and negative energies balance each other thus providing harmony in nature and in the universe. The twin mountain peaks, shaped like pyramids and the v-shaped valley in between them are symbols of the “Yin and Yang”, though they are placed side by side instead of overlapping. From the valley (the vessel) contains the rising sun with its seven (the mythical perfect number) rays as it reinvigorates, renews, and brings us hope and faith for a better future with the red silhouette of the bird of peace and love. These virtues become the source of life, strength and nourishment as they flow from the vessel symbolized by the river (water) flowing from the base of the valley and continuously refreshed by the loving guidance and intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus, and as the color of the Immaculate Conception, the Patroness of the Province and Archdiocese of Capiz, as symbolized by the blue sky. The meaning of the deer and the branch of leaves completes the mysticism of the meaning of the seal. These symbolisms can also be interpreted in a Christian perspective. The mountains and the sky symbolize our unity with Christ, our Savior and our Creator. This unity is manifested by the Divine graces, virtues, and blessings (the sun and the bird) contained in the vessel or chalice (the valley), which eternally (represented by the seven rays of the sun) flow out (represented by the river) to us to cleanse, nourish, and reinvigorate us, wherever we are (represented by the 58 stars symbolizing the 58 barangays) and whoever we are (represented by the deer, symbolizing the indigenous people). The symbolism of the deer is unintentionally similar to the “Moor of Freising” in the Coat of Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. Together with our reverence and care with His creation (represented by the color green and the branch of laurel leaves, which also symbolizes excellence and the greatness of these graces and unity), by being united with Christ and sharing in His perfect (represented by the number seven) and unlimited love in unity with Mary, His Blessed Mother (represented by the color blue of the sky), our unity with our Filipino (represented by the Captions and the colors blue and red) and Asian (the sun rising from the east) brothers and sisters, and our reverence to our ancestors and pride of our historical heritage (both represented by the number 1874), and our concern for the welfare of the future generations (represented by the number 2005 and the antlers of the deer) universal harmony (symbolized by the hexagram) reigns.

Captivating Capiz- History of Tapaz, Capiz

History

Tapaz was founded in 1835 but it continued being a part of Dumalag for many years. In 1862 and 1863 two letters were made to declare parish under the patronage of St. Jerome. Both were signed by Governor General Lemery, but they were never executed. Finally, in 1874, Tapaz was declared an independent parish by Jaro Bishop Mariano Cuartero.

Captivating Capiz- Territorial Boundary of Tapaz, Capiz

Territorial Boundary

a. Location — Tapaz lies within the latitude 11º 09’ to 11º 09’ 42” and the longitude of 121º 11’ to 122º 34’ 45”. b. Basic Description It is bounded on the northwest and northeast by the Municipality of Jamindan in the Province of Capiz, on the north by the Municipality of Libacao of the Province of Aklan, on the east by the Municipality of Dumalag of the Province of Capiz, on the west by the Province of Antique, and by the Province of Iloilo, principally by the Municipalities of Janiuay, Lambunao, Calinog and Bingawan from the Southwest to the Southeast.

Captivating Capiz- Tapaz, Capiz


Tapaz is a 3rd class municipality in the province of Capiz, Philippines. According to the 2000 census, it has a population of 44,085 people in 8,739 households.

Barangays

Tapaz is politically subdivided into 58 barangays.

  • Abangay
  • Acuña
  • Agcococ
  • Aglinab
  • Aglupacan
  • Agpalali
  • Apero
  • Artuz
  • Bag-Ong Barrio
  • Bato-bato
  • Buri
  • Camburanan
  • Candelaria
  • Carida
  • Cristina
  • Da-an Banwa
  • Da-an Norte
  • Da-an Sur
  • Garcia
  • Gebio-an
  • Hilwan
  • Initan
  • Katipunan
  • Lagdungan
  • Lahug
  • Libertad
  • Mabini
  • Maliao
  • Malitbog
  • Minan
  • Nayawan
  • Poblacion
  • Rizal Norte
  • Rizal Sur
  • Roosevelt
  • Roxas
  • Salong
  • San Antonio
  • San Francisco
  • San Jose
  • San Julian
  • San Miguel Ilawod
  • San Miguel Ilaya
  • San Nicolas
  • San Pedro
  • San Roque
  • San Vicente
  • Santa Ana
  • Santa Petronila
  • Senonod
  • Siya
  • Switch
  • Tabon
  • Tacayan
  • Taft
  • Taganghin
  • Taslan
  • Wright

Captivating Capiz- Sigma, Capiz


Sigma is a 4th class municipality in the province of Capiz, Philippines. According to the 2000 census, it has a population of 27,366 people in 5,541 households.

Barangays

Sigma is politically subdivided into 21 barangays.

  • Acbo
  • Amaga
  • Balucuan
  • Bangonbangon
  • Capuyhan
  • Cogon
  • Dayhagon
  • Guintas
  • Malapad Cogon
  • Mangoso
  • Mansacul
  • Matangcong
  • Matinabus
  • Mianay
  • Oyong
  • Pagbunitan
  • Parian
  • Pinamalatican
  • Poblacion Norte
  • Poblacion Sur
  • Tawog

Captivating Capiz- The town Center, Sapian, Capiz

The town center

In the center of town is a well-maintained park known simply as the plaza. It is the venue of many celebrations especially during the town fiesta. People of Sapian show lavish cultural and religious celebrations from July 22 to 26 each year in honour of their patron saint Santa Ana.

Few meters away from the plaza is the municipal hall which holds local government offices. Next to it is the barangay hall and health clinic. Nearby is Sapian Elementary School, two big churches: the Catholic Church and the Aglipayan Church, and the public market.

About one kilometer from the town center is Sapian National High School and Capiz State University (CAPSU) Sapian Branch.

Captivating Capiz- Sapian , Capiz


Sapi-an or Sapian is a 4th class municipality in the province of Capiz, Philippines. It belongs to the Second Congressional District of the Province of Capiz. The town's zip code is 5806.

On last count, Sapian has a total population of 25,316 people and 23,854 of the Sapianons are Catholics.

Sapian Bay which is situated in the northern part of the municipality is geographically joined with Capiz Bay. The 30 km² Sapian and Capiz shallow sea bays has extensive intertidal mudflats, sandy beaches, mangrove swamps, estuaries of several small rivers, and associated coastal lagoons and marshes.

Sapian Bay which opens up to the sea is a source of livelihood for many Sapianons. Marine produce from Sapian Bay include green mussels "tahong", oyster "talaba", lobster and different species of fish,and clams. Many lands near sea water were developed into fishponds that produce milkfish (bangus), prawns and crabs.

Another source of livelihood is agriculture. Carpets of rice fields, trees and flowers can be seen as one travels through Sapian along the national road which connect Roxas City to Iloilo and Aklan. The ricefield along the national road are slowly disappearing to give way to housing developments. Sapian's main agricultural produce are rice and coconuts.

Barangays

Sapian is politically subdivided into 10 barangays.

  • Agsilab
  • Agtatacay Norte
  • Agtatacay Sur
  • Bilao
  • Damayan
  • Dapdapan
  • Lonoy
  • Majanlud
  • Maninang
  • Poblacion

Captivating Capiz- President Roxas, Capiz


President Roxas is a 4th class municipality in the province of Capiz, Philippines. According to the 2000 census, it has a population of 27,531 people in 5,119 households. Originally known as Lutod-Lutod, it received its present name after it broke away from the neighboring municipality of Pilar during the booming years of the sugar industry in the 1960's.

Barangays

President Roxas is politically subdivided into 26 barangays.

  • Aranguel
  • Badiangon
  • Bayuyan
  • Cabugcabug
  • Carmencita
  • Cubay
  • Culilang
  • Goce
  • Hanglid
  • Ibaca
  • Madulano
  • Manoling
  • Marita
  • Pandan
  • Pantalan
  • Pinamihagan
  • Poblacion
  • Pondol
  • Quiajo
  • Sangkal
  • Santo Niño
  • Vizcaya

Captivating Capiz- Pontevedra, Capiz


Pontevedra is a 3rd class municipality in the province of Capiz, Philippines. According to the 2000 census, it has a population of 40,103 people in 7,673 households.

Barangays

Pontevedra is politically subdivided into 26 barangays.

  • Agbanog
  • Agdalipe
  • Ameligan
  • Bailan
  • Banate
  • Bantigue
  • Binuntucan
  • Cabugao
  • Gabuc (Caugiat)
  • Guba
  • Hipona
  • Intungcan
  • Jolongajog
  • Lantangan
  • Linampongan
  • Malag-it
  • Manapao
  • Ilawod (Pob.)
  • Ilaya (Pob.)
  • Rizal
  • San Pedro
  • Solo
  • Sublangon
  • Tabuc
  • Tacas
  • Yatingan

Captivating Capiz- People and Economy of Pilar, Capiz

People & Economy

Pilar is politically classified as a 4th class economy. Development in basic infrastructure has been stagnant during the last decades. Annual income is low and poverty rates are said to be high, although the town has also seen greater years. The rural municipality is said to be rich in natural resources such as aquatic and mineral wealth. It used to be a very strong seafood producer in the province and once even possessed its own sugar and mining industry.

Major agricultural products of the town include fish, prawn, crab, rice, sugar, cattle and poultry. The town also has its own Baptist Church and Iglesia ni Kristo Parish as wellas its own rural bank along the town market. Dulangan and Casanayan serve as satellite villages of the town.

Most of the town's population are made up by Austronesian descendants, followed by Aetas and a few of Chinese and Spanish ancestry.

Captivating Capiz- History and Culture of Pilar, Capiz

History & Culture

The coastal town sprang out from an Austronesian settlement in the early 16th century when indio natives managed to escape colonial tyranny from the Spaniards. The settlement was then known as Sibala, named after the river that ran through the coastal village. In 1570, however, the settlement was seized by Spanish colonial officials and the guardia civil took full control of the village. It later flourished into a bigger and prosperous town and was renamed after its designated patron saint La Nuestra Señora del Pilar ( Our Lady of the Pillar). Several friars and missionaries were assigned to preach in the town since then until it later received its permanent parish priest.

There had been a famous resistance called the Battle of Balisong during the Philippine Revolution in the 19th century as an attempt to overthrow Spanish officials in the municipality led by local revolutionaries Juan Arce and Dalmacio Patricio.

Today, an iconic 12-foot landmark of the Virgin Mary is visible at a mountaintop in Brgy. Dulangan, built by an affluent Chinese-Filipino merchant in honor of the town's patron saint, which is also said to have conducted miraculous powers to its devotees several times.

The town celebrates its annual feast along with the coming of the sacred Santisima Trinidad (The Holy Trinity), an early 18th century wooden figurine from Mexico found by local fishermen in the shores of the town during the British invasion of the Philippines in 1762. The figurine was said to be brought over to the Pacific by a Galleon trading ship from the port of Acapulco, Mexico which was destroyed by British warships during its route in Luzon and was washed off to the coast of Pilar. It is now still visible at the altar of the town's church, the Parish of the Most Holy Trinity.

The town is also known for its rich local heritage in mythology and folklore of legends and supernaturalism. The Legend of the Golden Shiptells the myth of a beautiful fairy that dwells in the caves of the town's mountainous forests and seduces young men every full moon wherein an illusionary lake appears inside the cave of Balisong and the mistress disappears with her victims in a golden ship along with the fading of the lake at sunrise.

Captivating Capiz- Pilar, Capiz


Pilar is a 4th class municipality in the province of Capiz, Philippines. According to the 2000 census, it has a population of 38,903 people in 7,747 households.

Geography

Pilar is politically subdivided into 24 barangays.

  • Balogo
  • Binaobawan
  • Blasco
  • Casanayan
  • Cayus
  • Dayhagan
  • Dulangan
  • Monteflor
  • Natividad
  • Olalo
  • Poblacion
  • Rosario
  • San Antonio
  • San Blas
  • San Esteban
  • San Fernando
  • San Nicolas
  • San Pedro
  • San Ramon
  • San Silvestre
  • Sinamongan
  • Santa Fe
  • Tabun-acan
  • Yating

Captivating Capiz- Panitan, Capiz


Panitan is a 4th class municipality in the province of Capiz, Philippines. According to the 2000 census, it has a population of 37,458 people in 7,073 households.

Barangays

Panitan is politically subdivided into 26 barangays.

  • Agbabadiang
  • Agkilo
  • Agloway
  • Ambilay
  • Bahit
  • Balatucan
  • Banga-an
  • Cabugao
  • Cabangahan
  • Cadio
  • Cala-an
  • Capagao
  • Cogon
  • Conciencia
  • Ensenagan
  • Intampilan
  • Pasugue
  • Poblacion Ilawod
  • Poblacion Ilaya
  • Quios
  • Salocon
  • Tabuc Norte
  • Tabuc Sur
  • Timpas
  • Tincupon
  • Tinigban

Captivating Capiz- Panay, Capiz


Panay or Pan-ay is a 4th class municipality in the province of Capiz, Philippines. According to the 2000 census, it has a population of 40,599 people in 7,660 households. It used to be the Capital of Capiz.

Barangays

Panay is politically subdivided into 42 barangays.

  • Agbalo
  • Agbanban
  • Agojo
  • Anhawon
  • Bagacay
  • Bago Chiquito
  • Bago Grande
  • Bahit
  • Bantique
  • Bato
  • Binangig
  • Binantuan
  • Bonga
  • Buntod
  • Butacal
  • Cabugao Este
  • Cabugao Oeste
  • Calapawan
  • Calitan
  • Candual
  • Cogon
  • Daga
  • Ilamnay
  • Jamul-awon
  • Lanipga
  • Lat-asan
  • Libon
  • Linao
  • Linateran
  • Lomboy
  • Lus-onan
  • Magubilan
  • Navitas
  • Pawa
  • Pili
  • Poblacion Ilawod
  • Poblacion Ilaya
  • Poblacion Tabuc
  • Talasa
  • Tanza Norte
  • Tanza Sur
  • Tico